• Morgan McGill

Coping with Problematic Family Members at Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is renowned as a time for togetherness, relaxation, and family. As we all know, however, things don’t always go so smoothly. If you are looking to avoid anger and awkwardness at the dinner table, here are some methods to try out this Turkey Day:


Sometimes the commotion of a crowded dining room full of obnoxious chatter can make one feel anxious. Try a breathing exercise: inhale through your nose for 5 seconds, hold for 3 seconds, and exhale through your mouth for 8 seconds.


If your older relative’s politics makes your blood boil, try talking about literally anything else. Is your Grandma wearing a lovely hat? Ask her where she got it, how much it was, if she plans on returning it. Small talk is the saving grace of all heated philosophical debates and should be utilized as such.


If you are dreading the onslaught of questions from a nosy relative about college, relationships, things you “should be doing,” try limiting your interactions with said person. If they ask, make your answers concise and brief. If they keep pestering, there’s nothing shameful about retreating to the kid’s table.


While you may not like with your relatives’ opinions and decisions, it’s important to remember that you only do this once a year. Let’s all try our best and make it through this Thanksgiving without a rendition of National Lampoon’s!

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